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Label:
  Dacapo Records - http://www.dacapo-records.dk/
Serial:
  6.220517
Title:
  Langgaard: Symphonies Nos. 12-14 - Dausgaard
Description:
  Rued Langgaard: Symphony No. 12 "Hélsingeborg", Symphony No. 13 "Belief in Wonders", Symphony No. 14 "The Morning"

Danish National Symphony Orchestra / DR
Thomas Dausgaard (conductor)
Track listing:
 
Genre:
  Classical - Orchestral
Content:
  Stereo/Multichannel
Media:
  Hybrid
Recording type:
 
Recording info:
  Recorded in the Danish Radio Concert Hall on 29 October 2004 (Symphony No. 12), 9-10 June 2006
(Symphony No. 14) and 15-16 June 2006 (Symphony No. 13).

Recording producer: Preben Iwan
Sound engineer: Jan Oldrup
Editing: Preben Iwan
Mastering: Preben Iwan and Jan Oldrup
Choir Master: Fredrik Malmberg
Artistic Director and General Manager, DNSO & Choirs / DR: Per Erik Veng

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Reviews: 3

Review by raffells November 24, 2006 (5 of 5 found this review helpful)
Performance:   Sonics:  
A welcome edition to the SACD catelogue.Sonically this is a Digital recording rather than DSD and is just short of the quality achieved in Dacapos best sacds.I got the distinct impression the string tone improved after the first few minutes? curious if anyone else thinks this.Musicwise this reminds me very much of the discussion and similarities re George Lloyd who was also looked down upon in his native land.
I am no stranger to Ruedss music and these new works to me remind me of several other symphonies on lp from the same company.Clearly he also looks back musically from this 1946 era composition but has a distinct style fairly easily recognizable and easy to listen to. The opening busy 12th symphony starts quote "Furiously Distinguised Agitated Wildly nervous and ends "Amok" A composer explodes".however the whole thing is done as they say,In the best possible taste and it is in no way Over the top or heavy..... Sym 13 Belief in Wonders, follows "Fairly Fast" and ends "Faster" but there is some wonderful playing and beauty in between. The14th (The Morning) for Chorus and orchestra is magnificently recorded even if the former is too prominent,They are clearly at home and passages like The Marble church Rings, The tired get up for life (I know that feeling) Dads rush to the Office ,pass on that one ? and finally Sun and Beech Forest ,rounds off an excellent release. ...More please...and more often,,
ps I forgot to mention the nice sounding organ and if anyone can identify that glorious haunting romantic tune on track 11 cribbed from someone else,please let me know .good booklet boring cover picture.Proper sacd case.

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Review by krisjan February 12, 2007 (2 of 2 found this review helpful)
Performance:   Sonics:  
The text for this review has been moved to the new site. You can read it here:

http://www.HRAudio.net/showmusic.php?title=4262#reviews

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Review by jlaurson October 10, 2007 (2 of 3 found this review helpful)
Performance:   Sonics:  
Someone who turned away from the style of composition that was ‘demanded’ in the 20th century was Rued Langgaard (1893 – 1952), and oddball of a composer I helplessly adore. Terribly backwards for his time, exploring sounds worlds that his predecessor Nielsen had already left behind in his later works, Langgaard goes looking for Wagnerian sounds, coupled with some of the colorful strangeness of Scriabin, and occasional lushness of Richard Strauss. But he is never quite so obviously old-fashioned. If you imagine a straight line between Sibelius and Einojuhani Rautavaara and put down your fist (not your finger) in the middle, you’ll have more or less arrived slightly north of Langgaard’s idiom. At least now you should know whether you might like him, or not. (Read Steve Smith’s piece about Langgaard in the New York Times.)

He composed 16 symphonies that discover brevity as the strongest form of statement. Glorious and odd beauty punctuate these works, some shorter than 10 minutes. A highly anti-romantic length for a symphony in the 1940s, when numbers 12 through 14 were written. Individual though Langgaard is, I hear touches of Rheinberger in Symphonies No.13 Undertro (“Belief in Wonders”) and Morgenen (“The Morning”), which is a lascivious suite for chorus and orchestra masquerading as Symphony No.14, with an opening that reminds me of Mendelssohn. That both were organists and happily made room for the Queen of instruments in their composition might go some way to explain that.

You’ll find the latter on a recent DACAPO disc, part of their renewed effort to record all of Langgaard’s symphonies, replacing the spottily available (and less than perfect) Danacord recordings with Ilya Stupel. It’s really as good a point to start with Langgaard symphonies as any – curiously strong compositions and excellent performances from Thomas Dausgaard and the Danish National Symphony. If you are new to Langgaard it’s better still to check out Volume 2 of his Violin Sonatas.
Especially the shorter pieces on this disc (Écrasez l’infâme, Aubade for Violin and Piano, Andante religioso for Violin and Organ) are marvelous examples of just how beautiful music can be. To know that you will enjoy this particular disc, all you need to know is that you like classical music. Sonatas Nos. 3 & 4, too, are worthwhile, though I would have wished the conciseness and brevity of some of his symphonies upon them.

Langaard’s most wicked composition though is, by far, “Antikrist”. It’s like an inverse Parsifal, condensed into one and a half hours. Mystical, incense-laden, absurd, brief, stunningly beautiful, and a touch perverse: Whether the slick and perfect recording of Dausgaard on the DACAPO hybrid SACD (also available on DVD) or the surprisingly fine live Danacord recording with the Innsbruck Symphony Orchestra (of all things) under Niels Muus, chances are you’ll have a blast.

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Works: 3  

Rued Langgaard - Symphony No. 12 "Hélsingeborg"
Rued Langgaard - Symphony No. 13 "Belief in Wonders"
Rued Langgaard - Symphony No. 14 "The Morning"